rhamphotheca:

Strong Solar Flares This Weekend A Big Double Wammy

(AURORA BOREALIS MAY BE VISIBLE TONIGHT!!!)

by Laura Geggel

Two powerful solar storms arriving at Earth today have captured the public’s attention for their potential to spark amazing auroras, but scientists say there’s another reason to watch. The solar double whammy is actually somewhat rare.

The particles from the two flares could interact as they head toward Earth, and researchers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Space Weather Prediction Center said they are monitoring the situation.

The sun unleashed a medium-sized flare on Monday (Sept. 8) followed by a second, larger flare, called an Earth-directed X-class flare, on Wednesday (Sept. 10). Both are from the same active sunspot region (Active Region 2158) and are directed at Earth, said Thomas Berger, director of the Space Weather Prediction Center, during a news conference yesterday (Sept. 11, 2014)…

(read more: Live Science)

images: Solar Dynamics Observatory - NASA and Accuweather

(via dendroica)

brains-and-bodies:

From Daily Anatomy



"Incredibly beautiful micrograph of blood clotting"



"This awesome picture is a coloured scanning electron micrograph of human red blood cells (erythrocytes, red) and platelets (thrombocyte, white) forming a blood clot. Clots are formed in response to cardiovascular disease or injuries to blood vessels. Platelets secrete chemicals that promote the accumulation of fibrin (not seen) and other blood components required for clot formation."
Magnification x7000, by Steve Gschmeissner

brains-and-bodies:

From Daily Anatomy

"Incredibly beautiful micrograph of blood clotting"
"This awesome picture is a coloured scanning electron micrograph of human red blood cells (erythrocytes, red) and platelets (thrombocyte, white) forming a blood clot. Clots are formed in response to cardiovascular disease or injuries to blood vessels. Platelets secrete chemicals that promote the accumulation of fibrin (not seen) and other blood components required for clot formation."

Magnification x7000, by Steve Gschmeissner

(via vetstudent-microbiologymaniac)

compoundchem:

This year’s Longitude Prize is focused on the growing problem of antibiotic resistant bacteria. They’ve put together a nice image, shown here, which showcases what they term ‘the ten most dangerous antibiotic resistant bacteria’. You can read more detail on each of them here:http://www.nesta.org.uk/news/antibiotic-resistant-bacteriaThe prize offers a £10 million prize fund for the development of a cheap, accurate, and easy to use bacterial infection test kit, which will allow doctors to prescribe the correct antibiotics at the correct time for patients, to try to help minimise the development of antibiotic resistance.

compoundchem:

This year’s Longitude Prize is focused on the growing problem of antibiotic resistant bacteria. They’ve put together a nice image, shown here, which showcases what they term ‘the ten most dangerous antibiotic resistant bacteria’. You can read more detail on each of them here:http://www.nesta.org.uk/news/antibiotic-resistant-bacteria

The prize offers a £10 million prize fund for the development of a cheap, accurate, and easy to use bacterial infection test kit, which will allow doctors to prescribe the correct antibiotics at the correct time for patients, to try to help minimise the development of antibiotic resistance.

(via dendroica)

humanoidhistory:

A section of the Rosette Nebula, courtesy of Don Goldman via NASA.

humanoidhistory:

A section of the Rosette Nebula, courtesy of Don Goldman via NASA.

(via crookedindifference)

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Vela SNR (Portion) - Hubble Palette
Credit: Martin Pugh

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Vela SNR (Portion) - Hubble Palette
Credit: Martin Pugh

compoundchem:

Today’s graphic takes a look at some of the different classes of antibiotics, and how they act to combat bacterial infections.You can see a bigger version of the graphic, and read more information on each of the classes, in the accompanying post: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-s0

compoundchem:

Today’s graphic takes a look at some of the different classes of antibiotics, and how they act to combat bacterial infections.

You can see a bigger version of the graphic, and read more information on each of the classes, in the accompanying post: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-s0

(via mindblowingscience)

tiny-creatures:

Tepuihyla edelcae, Ayarzaguena’s Treefrog in habitat, Auyan Tepui, Canaima National Park, Bolivar, Venezuela by Brad Wilson, DVM on Flickr.
the-shark-blog:

Grey nurse shark by Richard Barnett

txchnologist:

Synthetic Cells Move On Their Own

What look like animated illustrations that could easily spring from a child’s imagination are actually newly unveiled artificial cells under a microscope.

Biophysicists at Germany’s Technical University of Munich along with an international team developed simple self-propelled biomachines in a quest to create cell models that display biomechanical functions.

The researchers say their work represents the first time a movable cytoskeleton membrane has been fabricated.

Read More

(via starsaremymuse)

nubbsgalore:

lightning illuminates an ash cloud that extends ten kilometres high in this june 5, 2011 eruption of puyehue volcano, near osorno in southern chile. known as a dirty thunderstorm, this phenomenon is yet to be explained by science, as the source of the lightning (or the specific mechanism by which particles of differing charges are separated in the ash cloud) continues to be debated.   

photos by (click pic) claudio santanaivan alvarado, francisco negroni and carlos gutierrez.  (see also: the eruption of japan’s sakurajima volcano and the eruptions in eyjafjallajokull, iceland

(via we-are-star-stuff)

humanoidhistory:

Behold a few wonders of the cosmos: From top to bottom are galaxies M101, M81, Centaurus A, and M51. The images are a collaboration combining data from amateur astronomers and NASA mission archives. X-rays from Chandra are purple, infrared data from Spitzer are red, and the optical data are red, green, and blue. (Chandra X-ray Observatory)

(via lights-in-the-sky)

saveplanetearth:

Renewable energy capacity grows at fastest ever pace: Green technologies now produce 22% of world’s electricity @ International Energy Agency via Guardian

saveplanetearth:

Renewable energy capacity grows at fastest ever pace: Green technologies now produce 22% of world’s electricity @ International Energy Agency via Guardian

(via smarterplanet)

ted:

This is what sound looks like

You’ve never seen sound visualizations like this before. Evan Grant creates beautiful illustrations of what we hear by capturing the vibrations from sound waves in mediums like sand or water. This process — called cymatics — makes sound look so wonderfully alien.  

Watch the full talk here »

(via starsaremymuse)

scales-and-fangs:

Dragon Snake (Xenodermus javanicus)

(via realmonstrosities)

currentsinbiology:

How nerve cells communicate with each other over long distances: Travelling by resonance
How nerve cells within the brain communicate with each other over long distances has puzzled scientists for decades. The way networks of neurons connect and how individual cells react to incoming pulses in principle makes communication over large distances impossible. Scientists from Germany and France provide now a possible answer how the brain can function nonetheless: by exploiting the powers of resonance.
As Gerald Hahn, Alejandro F. Bujan and colleagues describe in the journal PLoS Computational Biology, the ability of networks of neurons to resonate can amplify oscillations in the activity of nerve cells, allowing signals to travel much farther than in the absence of resonance. The team from the cluster of excellence BrainLinks-BrainTools and the Bernstein Center at the University of Freiburg and the UNIC department of the French Centre national de la recherche scientifique in Gif-sur-Yvette created a computer model of networks of nerve cells and analyzed its properties for signal propagation.
Gerald Hahn, Alejandro F. Bujan, Yves Frégnac, Ad Aertsen, Arvind Kumar. Communication through Resonance in Spiking Neuronal Networks. PLoS Computational Biology, 2014; 10 (8): e1003811 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003811
Resonance in the activity of nerve cells (left) allows activity within the brain to travel over large distances, e.g. from the back of the head to the front during the processing of visual stimuli.  Credit: Gunnar Grah/BrainLinks-BrainTools

currentsinbiology:

How nerve cells communicate with each other over long distances: Travelling by resonance

How nerve cells within the brain communicate with each other over long distances has puzzled scientists for decades. The way networks of neurons connect and how individual cells react to incoming pulses in principle makes communication over large distances impossible. Scientists from Germany and France provide now a possible answer how the brain can function nonetheless: by exploiting the powers of resonance.

As Gerald Hahn, Alejandro F. Bujan and colleagues describe in the journal PLoS Computational Biology, the ability of networks of neurons to resonate can amplify oscillations in the activity of nerve cells, allowing signals to travel much farther than in the absence of resonance. The team from the cluster of excellence BrainLinks-BrainTools and the Bernstein Center at the University of Freiburg and the UNIC department of the French Centre national de la recherche scientifique in Gif-sur-Yvette created a computer model of networks of nerve cells and analyzed its properties for signal propagation.

Gerald Hahn, Alejandro F. Bujan, Yves Frégnac, Ad Aertsen, Arvind Kumar. Communication through Resonance in Spiking Neuronal Networks. PLoS Computational Biology, 2014; 10 (8): e1003811 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003811

Resonance in the activity of nerve cells (left) allows activity within the brain to travel over large distances, e.g. from the back of the head to the front during the processing of visual stimuli.  Credit: Gunnar Grah/BrainLinks-BrainTools

(via somuchscience)